Tag Archives: Science

Consider publishing your pollination and plant reproductive ecology research in the Turkish Journal of Botany!

This month I was appointed to the editorial board of the Turkish Journal of Botany and I’m looking forward to working with the team at the journal to enhance the international profile of this publication. The journal has a long track record: it’s been published continuously since the 1970s and currently has a 5-year impact factor of 1.165.

The Turkish Journal of Botany is one of the official publications of TÜBİTAK (the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey) and is fully open access, with no page charges. All papers are published in English. Although it’s a ‘regional’ journal, the scope of what it publishes is not limited to just Turkey. Looking over the last couple of volumes I see authors from Russia, India, Egypt, Lebanon, Pakistan, USA and China, as well as a new species of lichen from Antarctica!

The journal is particularly keen to publish more papers in the area of pollination, floral evolution, plant reproductive ecology, and related topics. So if you’re working in that area and looking for an outlet for your latest paper, please take a look at the Instructions for Authors and consider the Turkish Journal of Botany.

If you have any questions, please write a comment below or send me a message via the Contact page.

The largest West African flower: Pararistolochia goldieana!

Some years ago, browsing in a second hand bookshop, I happened across a copy of an old magazine from 1950 called Nigeria. Published by the then colonial government, it was a miscellaneous collection of articles about the culture, geography and natural history of that fascinating West African country. Although aspects of the contents are problematical by modern standards, I bought it because of a short article about a wild plant with enormous flowers and a remarkable pollination strategy. In particular, the spectacular photograph of a man holding a flower that’s the length of his forearm grabbed my attention: who couldn’t love a flower like that?!

The plant is Pararistolochia goldieana, a vine found in the forests of this region, as described in the introductory text:

These types of flowers are pollinated by flies, a common strategy in the Birthwort family (Aristolochiaceae) to which the plant belongs. This strategy of fly pollination in which flies are deceived into visiting the flowers by their stink and colour, and temporarily trapped in the enclosed chamber, is something that I explore in detail in my book Pollinators & Pollination: Nature and Society, particularly in the genus Ceropegia. Those plants show convergent evolution with the pollination systems of Aristolochiaceae, though they are unrelated.

Pararistolochia goldieana has a wide distribution across West Africa, including Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone. The IUCN Red List categorises it as ‘Vulnerable’ due to habitat loss. The population where these photographs were taken is described on the final page of the article:

The city of Ibadan is one of the largest in Nigeria and has grown enormously, ‘from 40 km2 in the 1950s to 250 km2 in the 1990s‘. I wonder if this forest, and its botanical treasures, still exists?

During field work in Gabon in the 1990s I was fortunate enough to encounter a species of Pararistolochia in the rainforest of Lopé National Park. It was a different species to P. goldieana, with rather smaller but no less spectacular flowers, and it stank to high heaven! We knew it was there long before we saw it. I collected some flies from the flowers and had them identified, though I’ve never published the data: it’s available if anyone is working on a review of pollination in the family.

This 1950 article is anonymous, so I don’t know who to acknowledge for the amazing images. However the botanist R.W.J. Keay was working on a revision of the family for the Flora of West Tropical Africa project at the time, so it may have been written by him.

Global effects of land-use intensity on pollinator biodiversity: a new study just published

Humans affect the land on which they live in many different ways, and this in turn influences local biodiversity. Sometimes this has positive effects on local wildlife: consider the diversity of birds to be found in well-managed suburban gardens, for example. But often the effect is negative, especially when the land is intensively managed or habitats are destroyed, for example via deforestation or urban development.

This is not a new phenomenon – according to a recent study, most of the habitable parts of the planet have been shaped by humans for at least 12,000 years (see Ellis et al. 2021). What is new, however, is the scale and the speed with which land-use is changing, which are far greater than they have been historically. An important question is the extent to which this change in land-use intensity is affecting pollinator diversity in different parts of the world. Over the past 18 months I’ve been collaborating on a project led by Joe Millard (as part of his PhD) and Tim Newbold which uses the Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems (PREDICTS) database to address that very question.

A paper from that collaboration is published today in the journal Nature Communications; it’s open access and can be downloaded by following this link.

The study was global in scale and used data from 12,170 sites to assess the affect of land-use intensity on 4502 pollinating species. The findings are really fascinating; highlights include:

  • In comparison to natural vegetation, low levels of land-use intensity can have a positive effect on the diversity of pollinators.
  • For most land categories, greater intensity of land-use results in significant reductions in diversity and abundance of pollinators, however. For example, for urban sites there’s a 43% drop in number of species and a drop in 62% pollinator abundance from the least to the most intensive urban sites.
  • On cropland, strong negative responses of pollinators to increasing intensity are only found in tropical areas, although different taxonomic groups vary in their responses.
  • The latter finding is especially concerning given that: (i) most pollinator diversity is found in the tropics; (ii) the majority of tropical crops are insect pollinated; and (3) tropical agriculture is becoming increasingly intensive and land use is likely to rapidly change in the coming decades.

The full reference for the study, with all authors, is:

Millard, J., Outhwaite, C.L., Kinnersley, R., Freeman, R., Gregory, R.D., Adedoja, O., Gavini, S., Kioko, E., Kuhlmann, M., Ollerton, J., Ren, Z.-X. & Newbold, T. (2021) Global effects of land-use intensity on local pollinator biodiversity. Nature Communications 12, 2902. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-23228-3

Natural Capital, Ecosystem Services, and Nature-Based Solutions: an analogy with books

The terms ‘Natural Capital’, ‘Ecosystem Services’, and ‘Nature-Based Solutions’ seem to generate one of two emotions in some people: confusion and irritation. Confusion stems from not appreciating that these are different, though closely related, concepts, as I will show below. Irritation often is the result of seeing ecosystem ‘valuation’ as a neo-liberal plot to somehow ‘sell-off nature’. I’ve discussed this irritation in the past – see this old post for instance about ‘How do we value nature?‘ – so I’m not going to dwell on it: some people see the advantage of using these concepts, others don’t. And that’s fine. But I will touch briefly on the confusion aspect because it pertains to a discussion on Twitter this morning that was stimulated by this tweet from Prof. James Bullock, in which he saw the three concepts as re-packaging on the same ideas under different (and confusing) names.

James and I have been friends for a long time, and there’s things we agree on and things we disagree on. And that’s also fine. But as I pointed out in my response to the tweet, I think that these concepts are different, and that they logically flow together. To me, Ecosystem Services are the benefits to society provided by Natural Capital. Nature-Based Solutions are strategies or schemes for targeting Natural Capital creation or enhancement (e.g. flood meadows or woodland) to provide Ecosystem Services (e.g. flood management or carbon storage).

The analogy that I used (which a few people seemed to appreciate) is that this is the difference between books, what we learn from books, and decisions on how to produce more books.

Since the publication of Pollinators & Pollination: Nature and Society, books have been on my mind a lot 🙂

As always, your comments are encouraged.

A spectacular new plant has been named to honour a colleague: meet Ceropegia heidukiae!

Finding organisms that have not previously been described by scientists is not unusual; every year, hundreds of ‘new’ species enter the taxonomic literature, a testament to how little we still understand about the Earth’s biodiversity. The majority of these species are insects, because that’s the most diverse group of organisms on the planet. But new species of plants and fungi also turn up regularly: for example in 2020, botanists and mycologists at Kew named 156, including some from Britain.

So although discovering undescribed species is not uncommon, any field biologist will tell you that it’s an exciting moment to spot something that you’re never seen before and which could turn out to be new. That was certainly the case when my colleague Dr Annemarie Heiduk’s attention was drawn to a South African plant that was clearly something special. As Anne said to me this week:

‘I will never ever forget the very moment when I spotted it and immediately knew it was something no-one has ever seen before. And I was so lucky to find it in flower. I cannot describe how beautiful it looked sticking out of the surrounding grass vegetation. It is certainly one of a kind and I really know how lucky I was to have found it. Not once did it ever cross my mind that I will discover a novel Ceropegia species, let alone one that is so distinct!’

So it was that last year Anne discovered the plant that was to be named in her honour: Ceropegia heidukiae. The species has been described by David Styles and Ulrich Meve in the journal Phytotaxa (from where the image above was taken). There’s also an account of the species on the Pollination Research Lab blog, with further photographs and information about the plant.

Anne has been honoured in this way not just because she discovered the plant, but also because, to quote the paper, she:

‘is a pollination ecologist who with her research on the floral chemistry and deceptive pollination strategies of Ceropegia trap flowers has acquired recognition as an expert in this field’

Anne tells me that she has already collected pollinator and floral scent data for this new species, so we can look forward to seeing that published in the near future. I described the fascinating pollination ecology of Ceropegia, including some of Anne’s earlier work, in my recent book. This is a genus of plants that has intrigued me since I first saw photographs of them and started growing them as a teenager, 40 years ago. Since then I’ve published several papers about their pollination strategies, and how they compare with the family Apocynaceae as a whole: see the following links for some examples:

https://jeffollerton.co.uk/2017/09/03/fly-pollination-in-the-trap-flower-genus-ceropegia-a-new-study-just-published/

https://jeffollerton.co.uk/2018/08/21/the-evolution-of-pollination-systems-in-one-of-the-largest-plant-families-a-new-study-just-published-download-it-for-free/

So, a big congratulations to Anne, and to David and Ulrich – it’s an amazing plant! I wonder what else is still waiting to be discovered in the stunning grasslands of South Africa?

Pollinators are allies in the fight against climate change: a new commentary just published in New Scientist

Over the past few months I’ve been thinking a lot about the relationship between the “Climate Emergency” (CE) and the “Ecological Emergency” (EE), and how they overlap considerably in terms of causes and solutions, but that the priorities of the CE often trump those of the EE. One of the outcomes of this has been a commentary that’s been published in New Scientist this week. It’s free to access – here’s the link:

https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg24933260-100-pollinators-are-our-secret-weapon-in-the-fight-against-global-warming/

It’s extracted from a much longer article that discusses the role of pollinators in relation to climate change. Hopefully that will be published in the not too distant future.

The other thing that’s happened this week is that, in my role as Visiting Professor of Biodiversity at the University of Northampton, I was asked to take part in a webinar that’s one of a series being produced in support of the Levelling Up Goals. The LUGs, modelled on the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have cross-party support in Parliament and aim to bring economic prosperity to those parts of the country that have lagged behind in recent decades. The “Green Economy” is seen as central to this.

The webinar was recorded and you can view it here: https://www.fit-for-purpose.org/engage/how-to-level-up-harness-the-energy-transition

It was interesting and I learned quite a bit, for example about how the government is investing the state pension pot in sustainable energy projects. The format of the webinar, however, with the chair asking individuals a question and each of us responding, was a little frustrating as there was no real opportunity to counter statements being made, particularly by the MP for Hexham.

Yesterday Karin and I had out first COVID-19 vaccination; today we both feel a little under the weather, but it will pass. It’s certainly better than the alternative!

Online talks and training: here’s a selection of what I offer

Over the past few months I’ve done a large number of online talks for a variety of audiences, including natural history and gardening societies, beekeeping groups, private companies, university estates departments, and ecological consultancies. I thought it would be useful to provide a list of what I offer, with a short description. All talks are accessible and understandable to a broad audience, and can be tailored to the individual needs of the group:

Pollinators & Pollination: Nature and Society is an introduction to the importance of pollinators and the pollination services that they provide to both wild and crop plants. The name, of course, reflects that of my recent book.

The Politics of Pollination is an account of how society (governments, organisations and individuals) has responded to the current “pollination crisis” (if that’s what it actually is…)

Bees in Cities: an Introduction to Urban Pollinators focuses on the positive roles that urban environments can play for pollinators, and the potential threats of city living.

Pollinators in Gardens gives practical advice on how to make your garden “pollinator friendly”.

Pollinator Conservation: Threats and Opportunities describes how and why pollinators are declining and what we can do about it at the individual and societal level.

Habitat Creation and Management for Pollinators gives an introduction to how NGOs, estates departments, consultancies, and so forth, can effectively support pollinators in ways that go beyond just planting flowers and putting up a few “bee hotels”.

To Be a Flower is an introduction to how flowers function and the ways in which they manipulate the behaviour of their pollinators to ensure reproduction.

Darwin’s Unrequited Isle: a Personal Natural History of Tenerife describes some of the field work that we’ve been doing on this most fascinating of the Canary Islands.

Biodiversity: What Is It and Why Should We Care? gives a very general overview of the topic of biodiversity and ecosystem services.

Talks typically last for around 50 minutes, following which I’m happy to answer questions and discuss any issues that have arisen. I also offer a half- or full-day of training for those organisations that need more depth, for example ecological consultancies. Note that I charge for all of my talks and training. If you would like to enquire about any of this, please use the form on the Contact page.

Finally, a physical copy of my book!

Yesterday I was delighted to finally receive an advance copy of my book Pollinators & Pollination: Nature and Society! It’s been over three years in the writing and production, much longer than I had anticipated. But, as I describe in its pages, the book is the culmination of >50 years of experience, study and research. So perhaps three years isn’t so bad…

If you’re interested in buying a copy you can order it direct from Pelagic Publishing and from most of the large online booksellers. Let me know what you think.

SCAPE 2020 by the numbers

Last Friday to Sunday I hosted the annual Scandinavian Association for Pollination Ecology (SCAPE) conference virtually. This is my first opportunity to report back as I took some time off and then tried to catch up with other tasks.

Running any scientific conference is hard work, and virtual ones are no exception! On Monday I was exhausted after a marathon long weekend of three 10-hour days in front of a computer chairing sessions, queuing up speakers and their talks, and generally making sure things ran as smoothly as possible. Of course before that there were literally weeks of preparation, and since then I have been doing follow up work of responding to emails, sending out certificates and receipts, etc.

It’s been quite a job and I couldn’t have done it with the help of my wife Karin (especially for the loan of her office space in the garden) and also Yannick Klomberg who was working on the website, dealing with the posters, etc., all on top of having a week old baby and his partner to look after! In addition I’m grateful to Paul Egan who ran the SCAPE Twitter account, and the session Chairs, keynote speakers, and participants who contributed to a really amazing conference. Our technical support crew from the University of Northampton were great too.

It was the largest SCAPE meeting so far held, no doubt because it was the first to be carried out virtually, with 352 participants from 41 countries listening to and chatting about 92 talks and viewing 39 posters. We also ran several well-attended evening discussion and poster sessions.

Long-standing SCAPEr Marcos Mendez kept a log of the number of participants in each of the sessions and I’ve graphed the data below, showing the broad themes of each group of sessions:

It’s pleasing to see that attendance was reasonably consistent over the course of the long weekend and that there was interest across the full spectrum of themes. The one downward blip was in session 5, which I can only surmise was due to it being the final session on Friday between 17:25 and 18:25.

As is traditional at SCAPE we announced the host of next year’s meeting at the very end. I’m delighted to announce that SCAPE 2021, the 35th annual meeting, will be held for the first time in Poland, where Marcin Zych will be the host. “Wider Scandinavia” just got wider….

SCAPE 2020 – pollinators & pollination conference: here’s the programme

There’s still a few hours left in which to register to attend the SCAPE 2020 pollinators and pollination conference. Follow the links on the website: https://scape-pollination.org/

The programme is more or less finalised and is shown below. We have an amazing range of topics being presented from both established and early career researchers, including two keynote lectures, plus posters. It’s going to be a very exciting weekend of science!

PROGRAMME

Talk types:

K = Keynote

ST = Standard (10 minutes talk + 5 for questions)

F = Flash talk (5 minutes, no questions)

Friday 6th November – all timings are GMT (London) time

TimingTypeNameTitleRef
09.00 –09.15 Jeff OllertonOpen conference and welcome 
09.15 –10.15KLynn DicksUnderstanding the risks to human well-being from pollinator declineK.01
10.15 –10.30 Comfort breakTime to top up your coffee 
Session 1 Chair: Jeff OllertonAgriculture – 1 
10.30 – 10.45STKe ChenIndirect and additive effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on insect pollination and crop yield of raspberry under different fertilizer levels1.01
10.45 – 11.00STJulia OstermanEnhancing mason bee populations for sweet cherry pollination1.02
11.00 – 11.15STIdan KahnonitchViral distributions in bee communities: associations to honeybee density and flower visitation frequency1.03
11.15 – 11.30STAnna Birgitte MilfordWho takes responsibility for the bees?1.04
11.30 – 11.45STEmma GardnerBoundary features increase and stabilise bee populations and the pollination of mass-flowering crops in rotational systems1.05
11.45 – 12.00STStephanie MaherEvaluating the quantity and quality of resources for pollinators on Irish farms1.06
12.00 –12.05FThomas TimberlakePollinators and human nutrition in rural Nepal: experiences of remote data collection during a global pandemic1.07
12.05 –12.15 Comfort break  
Session 2 Chair: Jane StoutAgriculture – 2 
12.15 – 12.30STMichael ImageThe impact of agri-environment schemes on crop pollination services at national scale2.01
12.30 – 12.45STNicola TommasiPlant – pollinator interactions in sub-Saharan agroecosystems2.02
12.45 – 13.00STTal ShapiraThe combined effects of resource-landscape and herbivory on pollination services in agro-ecosystems2.03
13.00 – 13.15STMárcia Motta MauésDespite the megadiversity of flower visitors, native bees are essential to açai palm (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) pollination at the Amazon estuary2.04
13.15 – 13.30 STSabrina RondeauQuantifying exposure of bumblebee queens to pesticide residues when hibernating in agricultural soils2.05
13.30 –13.35 FMaxime EeraertsLandscapes with high amounts of mass-flowering fruit crops reduce the reproduction of two solitary bees2.06
13.35 – 13.40FPatricia Nunes-SilvaCrop domestication, flower characteristics and interaction with pollinators: the case of Cucurbita pepo (Cucurbitaceae)2.07
13.40 – 14.30 Lunch break  
Session 3 Chair: Mariano DevotoNetworks and communities 
14.30 – 14.45STKit PrendergastPlant-pollinator networks in Australian urban bushland remnants are not structurally equivalent to those in residential gardens3.01
14.45 – 14.50FKavya MohanStructure of plant-visitor networks in a seasonal southern Indian habitat3.02
14.50 – 14.55FOpeyemi AdedojaAsynchrony among insect pollinator groups and flowering plants with elevation3.03
14.55 – 15.10STYael MandelikRangeland sharing by cattle and bees: moderate grazing does not impair bee communities and resource availability3.04
15.10 – 15.25STFelipe Torres-VanegasLandscape change reduces pollen quality indirectly by shifting the functional composition of pollinator communities3.05
15.25 – 15.40STIsabela Vilella-ArnizautQuantifying plant-pollinator interactions in the Prairie Coteau3.06
15.40 – 15.55 Comfort break  
Session 4 Chair: Nina SletvoldConservation perspectives – 1 
15.55 – 16.10STLise RoparsSeasonal dynamics of competition between honeybees and wild bees in a protected Mediterranean scrubland4.01
16.10 – 16.25STPhilip DonkersleyA One-Health model for reversing honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) decline4.02
16.25 – 16.40STNicholas TewNectar supply in gardens: spatial and temporal variation4.03
16.40 – 16.55STPeter GraystockThe effects of environmental toxicants on the health of bumble bees and their microbiomes4.04
16.55 – 17.10STHauke KochFlagellum removal by a heather nectar metabolite inhibits infectivity of a bumblebee parasite4.05
17.10 – 17.25 Comfort break  
Session 5 Chair: Anders NielsenConservation perspectives – 2 
17.25 – 17.40STMiranda BanePollinators on Guernsey and a Pesticide-free Plan5.01
17.40 – 17.55STJamie WildmanReintroducing Carterocephalus palaemon to England: using the legacy of a locally extinct butterfly as a (morpho)metric of future success5.02
17.55 – 18.10STSjirk GeertsInvasive alien Proteaceae lure some, but not other nectar feeding bird pollinators away from native Proteaceae in South African fynbos5.03
18.10 – 18.25STSissi Lozada GobilardHabitat quality and connectivity in kettle holes enhance bee diversity in agricultural landscapes5.04
18.25 –18.45 Comfort break  
18.45 – 23.59 Themed discussion rooms open  

Saturday 7th November – all timings are GMT (London) time

TimingTypeNameTitleRef
08.55 – 09.00 Jeff OllertonReminders and announcements 
Session 6 Chair: Jeff OllertonConservation perspectives – 3 
09.00 – 09.15STPaolo BiellaThe effects of landscape composition and climatic variables on pollinator abundances and foraging along a gradient of increasing urbanization6.01
09.15 – 09.30STJames RodgerPotential impacts of pollinator declines on plant seed production and population viability6.02
09.30 – 09.45STEmilie EllisMoth assemblages within urban domestic gardens respond positively to habitat complexity, but only at a scale that extends beyond the garden boundary6.03
09.45 – 10.00STSamuel BoffNovel pesticide class impact foraging behaviour in wild bees6.04
10.00 – 10.15 Comfort breakTime to top up your coffee 
Session 7 Chair: Jon AgrenConservation perspectives – 4 
10.15 – 10.20FMaisie BrettThe impacts of invasive Acacias on the pollination networks of South African Fynbos habitats7.01
10.20 – 10.25FJoseph MillardGlobal effects of land-use intensity on local pollinator biodiversity7.02
10.25 – 10.30FSusanne ButschkauHow does land-use affect the mutualistic outcomes of bee-plant interactions?7.03
10.30 – 10.35FElżbieta Rożej-PabijanImpact of wet meadow translocation on species composition of bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea: Apiformes)7.04
10.35 – 10.40FLorenzo GuzzettiMay urbanization affect the quality of pollinators diet? A case-study from Milan, Italy.7.05
10.40 – 10.45FEmiliano PioltelliFunctional traits variation in two bumblebee species along a gradient of landscape anthropization7.06
10.45 – 11.00 Comfort break  
Session 8 Chair: Marcos MendezPollinator behaviour – 1 
11.00 – 11.15STHema SomanathanForaging on left-overs: comparative resource use in diurnal and nocturnal bees8.01
11.15 – 11.30STSajesh VijayanTo leave or to stay? Answers from migratory waggle dances in Apis dorsata8.02
11.30 – 11.45STBalamurali MGSDecision making in the Asian honeybee Apis cerana is influenced by innate sensory biases and associative learning at different spatial scales8.03
11.45 – 12.00STGemma VillagomezResource intake of stingless bee colonies in a tropical ecosystem in Ecuador8.04
12.00 – 12.15STOla OlssonPollen analysis   using deep learning – better, stronger, faster8.05
12.15 – 13.00 Lunch break  
Session 9 Chair: Magne FribergPollinator behaviour – 2 
13.00 – 13.15STShuxuan Jing‘Interviewing’ pollinators in the red clover field: foraging behaviour9.01
13.15 – 13.30STOcéane BartholoméeHow to eat in the shade? Bumblebees’ behavior in partially shaded flower strips9.02
13.30 – 13.45STManuela GiovanettiMegachile sculpturalis: insights on the nesting activity of an alien bee species9.03
13.45 – 14.00    STZahra MoradinourThe allometry of sensory system in the butterfly Pieris napi9.04
14.00 – 14.05FPierre TichitNew insights into the visual ecology of bees9.05
14.05 – 14.10FFabian RuedenauerDoes pollinator dependence correlate with the nutritional profile of pollen in plants?9.06
14.10 – 14.15FHannah BurgerFloral signals involved in host finding by nectar-foraging social wasps9.07
14.15 – 14.30 Comfort break  
Session 10 Chair: ‪ Amy ParachnowitschFloral scent 
14.30 – 14.45STHerbert BraunschmidDoes the rarity of a flower´s scent phenotype in a deceptive orchid explain its pollination success?10.01
14.45 – 15.00STYedra GarcíaEcology and evolution of floral scent compartmentalization10.02
15.00 – 15.15STManoj Kaushalya RathnayakeDoes floral scent changes with pollinator syndrome?10.03
15.15 – 15.20FHanna ThostemanThe chemical landscape of Arabis alpina10.04
15.20 – 15.25FLaura S. HildesheimPatterns of floral scent composition in species providing resin pollinator rewards10.05
15.25 – 15.30FChristine Rose-SmythDoes Myrmecophila thomsoniana (Orchidaceae) use uncoupled mimicry to obtain pollination? 10.06
15.30 – 15.45 Comfort break  
Session 11 Chair: Renate WesselinghPollination ecology and floral evolution – 1 
15.45 – 16.00STRachel SpiglerAdaptive plasticity of floral display and its limits11.01
16.00 – 16.15STWendy SemskiIndividual flowering schedules and floral display size in monkeyflower: a common garden study11.02
16.15 – 16.30STCarlos MartelSpecialization for tachinid fly pollination and the evolutionary divergence between varieties of the orchid Neotinea ustulata11.03
16.30 – 16.45STMarcela Moré  Different points of view in a changing world: The tobacco tree flowers through the eyes of its pollinators in native and non-native ranges11.05
16.45 – 17.00 Comfort break  
17.00 – 18.00 Poster discussion rooms openA chance to talk with the author of the posters 
18.00 – 23.59 Themed discussion rooms open   

Sunday 8th November – all timings are GMT (London) time

TimingTypeNameTitleRef
08.55 – 09.00  Jeff OllertonReminders and announcements 
09.00 – 10.00KScott ArmbrusterPollination accuracy explains the evolution of floral movementsK.02
10.00 – 10.15 Comfort breakTime to top up your coffee 
Session 12 Chair: Jeff OllertonPollination ecology and floral evolution – 2 
10.15 – 10.30STKazuharu OhashiThree options are better than two: complementary nature of different pollination modes in Salix caprea12.01
10.30 – 10.45STJames CookWhy size matters in fig-pollinator mutualisms12.02
10.45 – 11.00STYuval SapirWithin-population flower colour variation: beyond pollinator-mediated selection12.03
11.00 – 11.15STHenninge Torp BieFlower visitation of the Sticky catchfly (Viscaria vulgaris) on isles within isle.12.04
11.15 – 11.20    
11.20 – 11.30 Comfort break  
Session 13 Chair: Yuval SapirPollination ecology and floral evolution – 3 
11.30 – 11.45STJonas KupplerImpacts of drought on floral traits, plant-pollinator interactions and plant reproductive success – a meta-analysis13.01
11.45 – 12.00STCarmen Villacañas de CastroCost/benefit ratio of a nursery pollination system in natural populations: a model application13.02
12.00 – 12.15STAnna E-VojtkóFloral and reproductive plant functional traits as an independent axis of plant ecological strategies13.03
12.15 – 12.30STCamille CornetRole of pollinators in prezygotic isolation between calcicolous and silicicolous ecotypes of Silene nutans13.04
12.30 – 12.45STCourtney GormanPhenological and pollinator-mediated isolation among selfing and outcrossing Arabidopsis lyrata populations13.05
12.45 – 13.45 Lunch break  
Session 14 Chair: Rocio BarralesPollination ecology and floral evolution – 4 
13.45 – 14.00STDanae LainaGeographic differences in pollinator availability in the habitats shape the degree of pollinator specialization in the deceptive Arum maculatum L. (Araceae)14.01
14.00 – 14.15  STEva GfrererIs the inflorescence scent of Arum maculatum L. (Araceae) in populations north vs. south of the Alps locally adapted to a variable pollinator climate?14.02
14.15 – 14.30STKelsey ByersPollinators and visitors to Gymnadenia orchids: historical and modern data reveal associations between insect proboscis and floral nectar spur length14.03
14.30 – 14.45STNina JirgalOrientation matters: effect of floral symmetry and orientation on pollinator entry angle14.04
14.45 – 15.00STAlice FairnieUnderstanding the development, evolution and function of the bullseye pigmentation pattern in Hibiscus trionum14.05
15.00 – 15.15 Comfort break  
Session 15 Chair: Maria Clara CastellanosPollination ecology and floral evolution – 5 
15.15 – 15.30STJon ÅgrenOn the measurement and meaning of pollinator-mediated selection15.01
15.30 – 15.45STKatarzyna RoguzPlants taking charge: Autonomous self-pollination as response to plants-pollinator mismatch in Fritillaria persica15.02
15.45 – 16.00STMario Vallejo-MarinBees vs flies: Comparison of non-flight vibrations and  implications for buzz pollination15.03
16.00 – 16.15STAgnes DellingerLinking flower morphology to pollen-release dynamics: buzz-pollination in Melastomataceae15.04
16.15 – 16.30STLucy NevardAre bees and flowers tuned to each other? Variation in the natural frequency of buzz-pollinated flowers.15.05
16.30 – 16.35 FGabriel Chagas LanesAn investigation of pollen movement and release by poricidal anthers using mathematical billiards15.06
16.35 – 16.40FRebecca HoeferThe magnitude of water stress and high soil nitrogen decreases plants reproductive success15.07
16.40 – 16.45FMarta BarberisMay ecotonal plants attract less efficient pollinators to stay on the safe side?15.08
16.45 – 17.00 Comfort break  
Session 16 Chair: Jeff OllertonPollination ecology and floral evolution – 6 
17.00 – 17.15STGabriela DoriaPetal cell shape and flower-pollinator interaction in Nicotiana16.01
17.15 – 17.30STNathan MuchhalaThe long stems characteristic of bat-pollinated flowers greatly reduce bat search times while foraging16.02
17.30 – 17.35FJuan Isaac Moreira-HernándezDifferential tolerance to heterospecific pollen deposition in sympatric species of bat-pollinated Burmeistera (Campanulaceae: Lobelioideae)16.03
17.35 – 17.40FJuan José Domínguez-DelgadoDoes autopolyploidy contribute to shape plant-pollinator interactions?16.04
17.40 – 17.45FCaio Simões BallarinHow many animal-pollinated plants are nectar-producing?16.05
17.45 – 17.50FAna Clara IbañezConcerted evolution between flower phenotype and pollinators in Salpichroa (Solanaceae)16.06
17.50 – 18.15 Jeff OllertonPrize announcements, conference handover and close.16.07