SCAPE 2020 – pollinators & pollination conference: here’s the programme

There’s still a few hours left in which to register to attend the SCAPE 2020 pollinators and pollination conference. Follow the links on the website: https://scape-pollination.org/

The programme is more or less finalised and is shown below. We have an amazing range of topics being presented from both established and early career researchers, including two keynote lectures, plus posters. It’s going to be a very exciting weekend of science!

PROGRAMME

Talk types:

K = Keynote

ST = Standard (10 minutes talk + 5 for questions)

F = Flash talk (5 minutes, no questions)

Friday 6th November – all timings are GMT (London) time

TimingTypeNameTitleRef
09.00 –09.15 Jeff OllertonOpen conference and welcome 
09.15 –10.15KLynn DicksUnderstanding the risks to human well-being from pollinator declineK.01
10.15 –10.30 Comfort breakTime to top up your coffee 
Session 1 Chair: Jeff OllertonAgriculture – 1 
10.30 – 10.45STKe ChenIndirect and additive effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on insect pollination and crop yield of raspberry under different fertilizer levels1.01
10.45 – 11.00STJulia OstermanEnhancing mason bee populations for sweet cherry pollination1.02
11.00 – 11.15STIdan KahnonitchViral distributions in bee communities: associations to honeybee density and flower visitation frequency1.03
11.15 – 11.30STAnna Birgitte MilfordWho takes responsibility for the bees?1.04
11.30 – 11.45STEmma GardnerBoundary features increase and stabilise bee populations and the pollination of mass-flowering crops in rotational systems1.05
11.45 – 12.00STStephanie MaherEvaluating the quantity and quality of resources for pollinators on Irish farms1.06
12.00 –12.05FThomas TimberlakePollinators and human nutrition in rural Nepal: experiences of remote data collection during a global pandemic1.07
12.05 –12.15 Comfort break  
Session 2 Chair: Jane StoutAgriculture – 2 
12.15 – 12.30STMichael ImageThe impact of agri-environment schemes on crop pollination services at national scale2.01
12.30 – 12.45STNicola TommasiPlant – pollinator interactions in sub-Saharan agroecosystems2.02
12.45 – 13.00STTal ShapiraThe combined effects of resource-landscape and herbivory on pollination services in agro-ecosystems2.03
13.00 – 13.15STMárcia Motta MauésDespite the megadiversity of flower visitors, native bees are essential to açai palm (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) pollination at the Amazon estuary2.04
13.15 – 13.30 STSabrina RondeauQuantifying exposure of bumblebee queens to pesticide residues when hibernating in agricultural soils2.05
13.30 –13.35 FMaxime EeraertsLandscapes with high amounts of mass-flowering fruit crops reduce the reproduction of two solitary bees2.06
13.35 – 13.40FPatricia Nunes-SilvaCrop domestication, flower characteristics and interaction with pollinators: the case of Cucurbita pepo (Cucurbitaceae)2.07
13.40 – 14.30 Lunch break  
Session 3 Chair: Mariano DevotoNetworks and communities 
14.30 – 14.45STKit PrendergastPlant-pollinator networks in Australian urban bushland remnants are not structurally equivalent to those in residential gardens3.01
14.45 – 14.50FKavya MohanStructure of plant-visitor networks in a seasonal southern Indian habitat3.02
14.50 – 14.55FOpeyemi AdedojaAsynchrony among insect pollinator groups and flowering plants with elevation3.03
14.55 – 15.10STYael MandelikRangeland sharing by cattle and bees: moderate grazing does not impair bee communities and resource availability3.04
15.10 – 15.25STFelipe Torres-VanegasLandscape change reduces pollen quality indirectly by shifting the functional composition of pollinator communities3.05
15.25 – 15.40STIsabela Vilella-ArnizautQuantifying plant-pollinator interactions in the Prairie Coteau3.06
15.40 – 15.55 Comfort break  
Session 4 Chair: Nina SletvoldConservation perspectives – 1 
15.55 – 16.10STLise RoparsSeasonal dynamics of competition between honeybees and wild bees in a protected Mediterranean scrubland4.01
16.10 – 16.25STPhilip DonkersleyA One-Health model for reversing honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) decline4.02
16.25 – 16.40STNicholas TewNectar supply in gardens: spatial and temporal variation4.03
16.40 – 16.55STPeter GraystockThe effects of environmental toxicants on the health of bumble bees and their microbiomes4.04
16.55 – 17.10STHauke KochFlagellum removal by a heather nectar metabolite inhibits infectivity of a bumblebee parasite4.05
17.10 – 17.25 Comfort break  
Session 5 Chair: Anders NielsenConservation perspectives – 2 
17.25 – 17.40STMiranda BanePollinators on Guernsey and a Pesticide-free Plan5.01
17.40 – 17.55STJamie WildmanReintroducing Carterocephalus palaemon to England: using the legacy of a locally extinct butterfly as a (morpho)metric of future success5.02
17.55 – 18.10STSjirk GeertsInvasive alien Proteaceae lure some, but not other nectar feeding bird pollinators away from native Proteaceae in South African fynbos5.03
18.10 – 18.25STSissi Lozada GobilardHabitat quality and connectivity in kettle holes enhance bee diversity in agricultural landscapes5.04
18.25 –18.45 Comfort break  
18.45 – 23.59 Themed discussion rooms open  

Saturday 7th November – all timings are GMT (London) time

TimingTypeNameTitleRef
08.55 – 09.00 Jeff OllertonReminders and announcements 
Session 6 Chair: Jeff OllertonConservation perspectives – 3 
09.00 – 09.15STPaolo BiellaThe effects of landscape composition and climatic variables on pollinator abundances and foraging along a gradient of increasing urbanization6.01
09.15 – 09.30STJames RodgerPotential impacts of pollinator declines on plant seed production and population viability6.02
09.30 – 09.45STEmilie EllisMoth assemblages within urban domestic gardens respond positively to habitat complexity, but only at a scale that extends beyond the garden boundary6.03
09.45 – 10.00STSamuel BoffNovel pesticide class impact foraging behaviour in wild bees6.04
10.00 – 10.15 Comfort breakTime to top up your coffee 
Session 7 Chair: Jon AgrenConservation perspectives – 4 
10.15 – 10.20FMaisie BrettThe impacts of invasive Acacias on the pollination networks of South African Fynbos habitats7.01
10.20 – 10.25FJoseph MillardGlobal effects of land-use intensity on local pollinator biodiversity7.02
10.25 – 10.30FSusanne ButschkauHow does land-use affect the mutualistic outcomes of bee-plant interactions?7.03
10.30 – 10.35FElżbieta Rożej-PabijanImpact of wet meadow translocation on species composition of bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea: Apiformes)7.04
10.35 – 10.40FLorenzo GuzzettiMay urbanization affect the quality of pollinators diet? A case-study from Milan, Italy.7.05
10.40 – 10.45FEmiliano PioltelliFunctional traits variation in two bumblebee species along a gradient of landscape anthropization7.06
10.45 – 11.00 Comfort break  
Session 8 Chair: Marcos MendezPollinator behaviour – 1 
11.00 – 11.15STHema SomanathanForaging on left-overs: comparative resource use in diurnal and nocturnal bees8.01
11.15 – 11.30STSajesh VijayanTo leave or to stay? Answers from migratory waggle dances in Apis dorsata8.02
11.30 – 11.45STBalamurali MGSDecision making in the Asian honeybee Apis cerana is influenced by innate sensory biases and associative learning at different spatial scales8.03
11.45 – 12.00STGemma VillagomezResource intake of stingless bee colonies in a tropical ecosystem in Ecuador8.04
12.00 – 12.15STOla OlssonPollen analysis   using deep learning – better, stronger, faster8.05
12.15 – 13.00 Lunch break  
Session 9 Chair: Magne FribergPollinator behaviour – 2 
13.00 – 13.15STShuxuan Jing‘Interviewing’ pollinators in the red clover field: foraging behaviour9.01
13.15 – 13.30STOcéane BartholoméeHow to eat in the shade? Bumblebees’ behavior in partially shaded flower strips9.02
13.30 – 13.45STManuela GiovanettiMegachile sculpturalis: insights on the nesting activity of an alien bee species9.03
13.45 – 14.00    STZahra MoradinourThe allometry of sensory system in the butterfly Pieris napi9.04
14.00 – 14.05FPierre TichitNew insights into the visual ecology of bees9.05
14.05 – 14.10FFabian RuedenauerDoes pollinator dependence correlate with the nutritional profile of pollen in plants?9.06
14.10 – 14.15FHannah BurgerFloral signals involved in host finding by nectar-foraging social wasps9.07
14.15 – 14.30 Comfort break  
Session 10 Chair: ‪ Amy ParachnowitschFloral scent 
14.30 – 14.45STHerbert BraunschmidDoes the rarity of a flower´s scent phenotype in a deceptive orchid explain its pollination success?10.01
14.45 – 15.00STYedra GarcíaEcology and evolution of floral scent compartmentalization10.02
15.00 – 15.15STManoj Kaushalya RathnayakeDoes floral scent changes with pollinator syndrome?10.03
15.15 – 15.20FHanna ThostemanThe chemical landscape of Arabis alpina10.04
15.20 – 15.25FLaura S. HildesheimPatterns of floral scent composition in species providing resin pollinator rewards10.05
15.25 – 15.30FChristine Rose-SmythDoes Myrmecophila thomsoniana (Orchidaceae) use uncoupled mimicry to obtain pollination? 10.06
15.30 – 15.45 Comfort break  
Session 11 Chair: Renate WesselinghPollination ecology and floral evolution – 1 
15.45 – 16.00STRachel SpiglerAdaptive plasticity of floral display and its limits11.01
16.00 – 16.15STWendy SemskiIndividual flowering schedules and floral display size in monkeyflower: a common garden study11.02
16.15 – 16.30STCarlos MartelSpecialization for tachinid fly pollination and the evolutionary divergence between varieties of the orchid Neotinea ustulata11.03
16.30 – 16.45STMarcela Moré  Different points of view in a changing world: The tobacco tree flowers through the eyes of its pollinators in native and non-native ranges11.05
16.45 – 17.00 Comfort break  
17.00 – 18.00 Poster discussion rooms openA chance to talk with the author of the posters 
18.00 – 23.59 Themed discussion rooms open   

Sunday 8th November – all timings are GMT (London) time

TimingTypeNameTitleRef
08.55 – 09.00  Jeff OllertonReminders and announcements 
09.00 – 10.00KScott ArmbrusterPollination accuracy explains the evolution of floral movementsK.02
10.00 – 10.15 Comfort breakTime to top up your coffee 
Session 12 Chair: Jeff OllertonPollination ecology and floral evolution – 2 
10.15 – 10.30STKazuharu OhashiThree options are better than two: complementary nature of different pollination modes in Salix caprea12.01
10.30 – 10.45STJames CookWhy size matters in fig-pollinator mutualisms12.02
10.45 – 11.00STYuval SapirWithin-population flower colour variation: beyond pollinator-mediated selection12.03
11.00 – 11.15STHenninge Torp BieFlower visitation of the Sticky catchfly (Viscaria vulgaris) on isles within isle.12.04
11.15 – 11.20    
11.20 – 11.30 Comfort break  
Session 13 Chair: Yuval SapirPollination ecology and floral evolution – 3 
11.30 – 11.45STJonas KupplerImpacts of drought on floral traits, plant-pollinator interactions and plant reproductive success – a meta-analysis13.01
11.45 – 12.00STCarmen Villacañas de CastroCost/benefit ratio of a nursery pollination system in natural populations: a model application13.02
12.00 – 12.15STAnna E-VojtkóFloral and reproductive plant functional traits as an independent axis of plant ecological strategies13.03
12.15 – 12.30STCamille CornetRole of pollinators in prezygotic isolation between calcicolous and silicicolous ecotypes of Silene nutans13.04
12.30 – 12.45STCourtney GormanPhenological and pollinator-mediated isolation among selfing and outcrossing Arabidopsis lyrata populations13.05
12.45 – 13.45 Lunch break  
Session 14 Chair: Rocio BarralesPollination ecology and floral evolution – 4 
13.45 – 14.00STDanae LainaGeographic differences in pollinator availability in the habitats shape the degree of pollinator specialization in the deceptive Arum maculatum L. (Araceae)14.01
14.00 – 14.15  STEva GfrererIs the inflorescence scent of Arum maculatum L. (Araceae) in populations north vs. south of the Alps locally adapted to a variable pollinator climate?14.02
14.15 – 14.30STKelsey ByersPollinators and visitors to Gymnadenia orchids: historical and modern data reveal associations between insect proboscis and floral nectar spur length14.03
14.30 – 14.45STNina JirgalOrientation matters: effect of floral symmetry and orientation on pollinator entry angle14.04
14.45 – 15.00STAlice FairnieUnderstanding the development, evolution and function of the bullseye pigmentation pattern in Hibiscus trionum14.05
15.00 – 15.15 Comfort break  
Session 15 Chair: Maria Clara CastellanosPollination ecology and floral evolution – 5 
15.15 – 15.30STJon ÅgrenOn the measurement and meaning of pollinator-mediated selection15.01
15.30 – 15.45STKatarzyna RoguzPlants taking charge: Autonomous self-pollination as response to plants-pollinator mismatch in Fritillaria persica15.02
15.45 – 16.00STMario Vallejo-MarinBees vs flies: Comparison of non-flight vibrations and  implications for buzz pollination15.03
16.00 – 16.15STAgnes DellingerLinking flower morphology to pollen-release dynamics: buzz-pollination in Melastomataceae15.04
16.15 – 16.30STLucy NevardAre bees and flowers tuned to each other? Variation in the natural frequency of buzz-pollinated flowers.15.05
16.30 – 16.35 FGabriel Chagas LanesAn investigation of pollen movement and release by poricidal anthers using mathematical billiards15.06
16.35 – 16.40FRebecca HoeferThe magnitude of water stress and high soil nitrogen decreases plants reproductive success15.07
16.40 – 16.45FMarta BarberisMay ecotonal plants attract less efficient pollinators to stay on the safe side?15.08
16.45 – 17.00 Comfort break  
Session 16 Chair: Jeff OllertonPollination ecology and floral evolution – 6 
17.00 – 17.15STGabriela DoriaPetal cell shape and flower-pollinator interaction in Nicotiana16.01
17.15 – 17.30STNathan MuchhalaThe long stems characteristic of bat-pollinated flowers greatly reduce bat search times while foraging16.02
17.30 – 17.35FJuan Isaac Moreira-HernándezDifferential tolerance to heterospecific pollen deposition in sympatric species of bat-pollinated Burmeistera (Campanulaceae: Lobelioideae)16.03
17.35 – 17.40FJuan José Domínguez-DelgadoDoes autopolyploidy contribute to shape plant-pollinator interactions?16.04
17.40 – 17.45FCaio Simões BallarinHow many animal-pollinated plants are nectar-producing?16.05
17.45 – 17.50FAna Clara IbañezConcerted evolution between flower phenotype and pollinators in Salpichroa (Solanaceae)16.06
17.50 – 18.15 Jeff OllertonPrize announcements, conference handover and close.16.07

2 Comments

Filed under Biodiversity, Pollination

2 responses to “SCAPE 2020 – pollinators & pollination conference: here’s the programme

  1. Wow – range of topics is mind-boggling. Wish I could attend… Would love to hear Lynn Dicks keynote! Any chance it might be public/published?

    Liked by 1 person

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